Article about Loudness in the New York Times


(Chris ) #1

This is a nice read on the loudness wars with an interesting long term conclusion…


(Mike Treadaway) #2

Interesting read. Might go some way to explain why - according to BBC Radio 4 discussion yesterday - people (even those way to young to have heard them first time round) find it easier to remember and recognise songs from the 60s and 70s …

BBC4 - You and Yours


#3

I still listen to (the UK’s BBC) Radio One that I did when I was young and ask myself: “how many of these tracks will stand the test of time?” Answer: not many, though that’s probably always been true.

I suspect that there is also a genre thing going on. Personally I don’t find Rap and Hip-Hop songs distinctive enough to be memorable on an individual basis – it’s all a blur. (There are, of course, notable exceptions.) I also think that songs which are inherently tuneful are probably more memorable / recollect-able.


(Jonas) #4

Maybe this is why I find it sooo hard to listen to a whole album by for example, Black Stone Cherry. It’s one of my genres and I do like them but never more than 1 or two songs at a time. I know their albums are quite compressed (5 -7db).


(Reader of the Internets) #5

No, you’re absolutely right. There is no good music after 1975 :wink:.


(Randy Hatcher) #6

Exactly. I recall when I attended a Paul McCartney concert a few years ago thinking how many popular artists today will still have such a following and generate this much excitement 40 years from now? Nobody. Certain music (classical, jazz, big band, blues…) is timeless but I can’t think of anything today that will have any lasting impact on the world of music.


(Spencer Marquart) #7

Great article. Thanks for the share!


(David Nightingale) #8

On a related note, is there any way to sort/select albums in Roon based on dynamic range? I know this can be done with Tracks, but can’t work out if there’s any way to do it with respect to the album as a whole.