Useage of numerical values in translations


(Mikael Ollars) #1

You see quite a lot of phrases like “1 Composer” to be translated.
Is the number 1 a variable or always representing the numerical value of 1?

It matters for the translation to my language, where you normally don’t use small numericals in text. I.e. it should be translated into “One Composer” instead…


(Mikael Ollars) #2

@mike, any input on this?


(Christopher Rieke) #3

The 1 should not be any placeholder in the translation strings (afaik).

There are other strings like

{count} Composers

Here {count} is a placeholder for {count} > 1.


(Christopher Rieke) #4

Just wanted to add: I had a similar issue with german translations.
If you write out “1” in german, it would be “Eins”. In the context of your example it would bee grammatically not correct as you’d write “Ein Komponist” (and not “Eins Komponist”). But it is also not very uncommon to write the number 1 as a number here.
Anyway, I decided to use numbers all the way, as I feel it is better and faster readable and visually more consistent.


(Mikael Ollars) #5

Appreciate the input, we stumble upon similar issues with some words in swedish too!
However, the more i think about it i feel that the numerical representation, if not gramatically correct, is clearer and more ”coherent” in how we see things in the computer world.
I think we’ll see some input from the swedish translators on this too!


(Anders Vinberg) #6

Especially for cases where it might be more than one.
It would br strange to write
One composer
5 composers

Even though grammarians say you should spell out numbers up through nine or so. But we don’t do that in user interfaces.