National Frozen Custard Day!

(Reader of the Internets) #1

Just want to wish everyone a happy National (U.S., I suppose) Frozen Custard Day!

(Andrew Cox) #2

Frozen custard ?
I’m familiar with warm gooey custard and solid “snot block” (vanilla slice) custard, but the ways of frozen custard are strange to me.

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(Scott G) #3

The next time you are in the Midwest USA (particularly the Milwaukee Wisconsin area), by all means, indulge. Culver’s frozen custard makes ice cream seem ‘meh’.
You DO travel to Milwaukee Wisconsin frequently, no?

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#4

Ok i might be missing something here, not being from the US, but isn’t frozen custard just ice cream?? I mean ice cream is basically just a custard with additional flavours added, and then frozen (carefully!)

#5

I have been to Milwaukee, way back in the early 90s… dont remember the frozen custard if I am honest. Wisconsin is a beautiful state though!

(Ged) #6

" Ice cream is made from milk, cream, or a combination of the two, while frozen custard is made from milk, cream, and egg yolks. Also, while the machine used to make ice cream churns air into it to make it have a light mouthfeel, frozen custard is produced in a machine that barely incorporates air into it, which means it’s way more dense."

#7

Ok thanks that makes sense, at least the part about the churning does. Plenty of ice cream has egg yolks in though.

(Ged) #8

At least it sounds like an edible dessert. I’ll never forget my older sister bringing a jar of this stuff home as a curio on her visit to the US.

(Scott G) #9

That makes sense. You’ll recall that the first Culver’s opened in Sauk City in 1984 and the first franchise was in Baraboo in 1990. So there wasn’t much of a presence in the early 90’s.
In Wisconsin, Culver’s and frozen custard are synonymous, doncha know.

#10

Fluffernutter, peanut butter and marshmallow creme sandwich is actually, and somewhat perversely, delicious … and the good thing it is only about 8000 calories.

#11

You learn something new everyday :+1:

Id love to go back to Wisconsin, and not just for the frozen custard !

(Ged) #12

I think you are mixing up Delicious - having a very pleasant taste or smell with Nauseating - making you feel as if you are going to vomit
:slight_smile:

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#13

An acquired taste of course :laughing:

(Scott G) #14

This then would distinguish Fluff from other universally loved things like Vegemite, or haggis.

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(Ged) #15

I’m 50/50 on those two.

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#16

Agreed, haggis :heavy_check_mark: vegemite/marmite/bovril :face_vomiting:

(Terry Murray) #17

Also, ice cream is served at a much lower temperature than frozen custard, typically 0-5 F. It needs to be frozen after preparation in the batch freezer. Custard can be served right out of the machine. It is softer and creamier than ice cream when served.

(Tom T) #18

Thanks for the info. Custard tonite fer sure.

(Reader of the Internets) #19

Well, I feel sorry for you, then. Some folks at Coney Island in New York had the bright idea, one hot day a hundred years ago, of putting that warm gooey custard, all cream and egg yolks, into an ice cream freezer. It’s amazing.

(Reader of the Internets) #20

Really, who doesn’t? If only to visit the Koss factory.

Culver’s is not looked on favorably by the cognoscenti. Personally, I’ve found ice crystals in their custard, a big no-no. Kopps, Leon’s, and Gilles, are the Milwaukee places to visit, with Kopps perhaps in the lead. Farther north in Green Bay, it’s Zesty’s, and out in Madison, there’s Michaels.